Putting Code Together Since 1987

We’re moving! Sort of…

In Wordpress on December 4, 2008 at 12:09 pm

We set up LiverpoolWebDesigner.com on the WordPress.com service in part because we were curious about what the traffic effects of being on WordPress.com could lead to.

But you know, there comes a time when you want to play with the extra features that a self-hosted WordPress site can give you over the hosted options.  We want to use some of our own themes, instead of the limited selection here and although our themes are lined up to become available at WordPress.com, it’s taking time.  A loooong time.  And some of our cleverer stuff isn’t even suitable for here.

So on that note… within the next week or so, the moment you find this post has disappeared and been replaced by a We’ve Moved post, you’ll know that we’ve gone to our new home on our own server.  Join us and help us warm the place up!

Open Source Isn’t for Everybody – a thought experiment

In Business, Web Development, Wordpress on October 26, 2008 at 1:53 pm

I’ve been thinking hard about Open Source and whether or not to GPL all of our forthcoming themes at Spectacu.la, following on from Brian Gardner’s decision with Revolution.

And I’ve decided that it would be a rather bad idea for us.  In fact, if you’re trying to build a strong business up from Open Source you can never make everything truly open.  So for example, although WordPress is free and GPL, WordPress.com has lots of proprietary code that will never see the light of Open Source.  And you pay for various services that use this proprietary code.  At the same time, they can cheerfully absorb, at zero cost if they wish, various GPL licensed themes and plugins.

A Toaster Analogy

The broken toaster - by Charles Dyer (CC License some restrictions)

The broken toaster - by Charles Dyer (CC License some restrictions)

A toaster company realises that although developing toasters is hard and expensive, they’re practically free to manufacture.  So why not give the toasters away and just charge for repairs, and helping people install their toasters at home, cleaning services, insurance if it burns the house down and so on.

Where does the motivation for service rather than product related income then come from?  Well – it comes from not making a simple, reliable and easy to use toaster.  In fact, because anyone can copy your toaster, you have to continuously add new features to stay ahead of the rival toaster copiers and keep people coming to you rather than your rivals for help.  You can make your toaster corporate strength – a toaster for major organisations that need to make vast amounts of toast… and they’d definitely want support and help… but you end up with small users running vastly over-powered and over-complicated toasters.

If You Want to Hire a Professional, Act Like One

In Business, Web Development on October 4, 2008 at 9:36 am

Now, this may seem a little bit of a testy post.  But ultimately I want to help.  The post’s being written because I was thinking back to the past couple of years, and the range of clients and potential clients I’ve met.  It’s also based on what I’ve seen in forums, on websites, and in other events.

To be honest, most of our potential and true clients are great.  True pros who value what we do, and trust us to do it well.  But there have been a few who tried our patience.

So here’s ten simple rules of how to work with web designers, developers and other IT professionals.  Most of it boils down to the headline.  Be professional yourself and reap the rewards.

1. Don’t Call Us Geeks

No really.  Don’t.

I can call me a geek.  I can call a geek a geek.  But just like I can’t call a black dude n**ger even if he uses the word himself, you can’t call me a geek.  It suggests a lack of respect.

And don’t even think of calling us nerds.  That might just add 50% to your quote.  Or at its worst, cause an undesired tension in your working relationship which is far worse than paying a bit more.

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